Blog

Hello, it's me. I was wondering if after all these years you'd like to meet, to go over everything.

My thanks to Adele for the intro. A very warm welcome to my brand new shiny website and my very first ramblings on what I hope will become a blog focused around my love of photography with a bit of personal stuff blended into the mix. I hope you find it informative, amusing and rewarding.

I have harboured a waxing and waning desire for a long time to set up a website to display some of my photography, talk about how I chose my gear, what I look for, what I have, and how I find what I want to photograph. In recent times, especially since developing a photography related Facebook page in addition to my long established Instagram feed, I have been increasingly prompted by others to start a website or asked if I have a website. Well I have now. 

While I'd love to say photography is lucrative, it so isn't. Very, very, few photographers make a living out of it without some other form of primary income supplementation and this is becoming increasingly so in a world awash with mobile phone cameras at the ready. You do it for the love of it. For me, its very much a hobby, and my reward is in bringing pleasure to viewers who like my work. 

Its fairly clear from my gallery that like a moth to a headlight, I'm drawn to coastal scenes around dawn and dusk. I love this time of the day as the light is quickly changing and light is at the heart of photography. Like dipping your hand into an assortment of chocolates there is a certain  anticipation with photography as you never know what is going to take to the stage around you in 'the golden hours'. The scene may evolve soft and muted or have mid tone pinks, apricots, mauves, reds, or be riotously colourful, or of course it can fail to mesmerise at all. The good thing is there's always tomorrow.

Aside from 'golden hour' photography I also like the ever changing seascape and the beauty of it from a 'sheet of glass' surface to a full on raging tempest. Living in a cruise ship port of call, I  like photographing these ships from different perspectives. I love landscapes in general and a bit of street photography although I've never been comfortable photographing people going about their business. The degree of comfort or discomfort in street photography is very dependent on the context of the photography.

I believe that the more you succumb to the photography bug, the more you see of the world around you.   

In other news let me introduce you to my great, great, great grandfather, acclaimed German composer, theatre director, conductor and political agitator Wilhelm Richard Wagner (1813 - 1883)  who is primarily known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, "music dramas"). Wagner's second wife Cosima was the daughter of famous Hungarian composer and pianist Franz Liszt. 

 

Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works in the romantic vein of Weber and Meyerbeer, Wagner revolutionised opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk ("total work of art"), by which he sought to synthesise the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, with music subsidiary to drama, and which was announced in a series of essays between 1849 and 1852. Wagner realised these ideas most fully in the first half of the four-opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung).

His compositions, particularly those of his later period, are notable for their complex textures, rich harmonies and orchestration and the elaborate use of leitmotifs —musical phrases associated with individual characters, places, ideas or plot elements. His advances in musical language, such as extreme chromaticism and quickly shifting tonal centres, greatly influenced the development of classical music. His Tristan und Isolde is sometimes described as marking the start of modern music. The dark side was that he was an Anti-Semite and Adolf Hitler's favourite composer.

Of course one of his most recognisable compositions 'The Bridal Chorus' has accompanied countless thousands of brides down the aisle on their wedding day.

So there you go. There's a bit of famous history in the family. I'm sure if Richard Wagner had been in to photography his compositions would have been great.

A bit more on Wagner next time and how a spot of afternoon delight saw the beginnings of my family connection.

 

Kind regards

Chris